May 16

Repost: Food is not a four-letter word. Help for picky eaters!

picky_eaterMy son has Sensory Processing Disorder (also known as Sensory Integration Dysfunction). One aspect of the vast range of symptoms of the disorder is that he is a very picky eater. He doesn’t want to try new foods, he doesn’t like his foods mixed together (which means he can’t appreciate my casseroles, soups, and salads), and he doesn’t even want to eat a food that has touched another on his plate. I knew he was sensitive to the textures and smells of foods because of his oral and olfactory sensitivities. But it took some research to figure out that there is much more to it than just that.

He’s thinner than I’d like, especially after a growth spurt, but we’re thankful that so far this problem hasn’t restricted his growth or health. Mostly, it’s just very annoying to me as a parent. I work hard to cook a healthy, tasty meal for the family, and pat myself on the back for not buying fast food or overly processed/frozen items, but it seems his first response is always, “Mom, this is yucky. Can I have a PB&J?” It’s hard to shake the feelings of under appreciation and worry about his health and remember that it’s really about his neurological disorder.

Over the years, we’ve tried to choose our battles, and until lately food hasn’t been one of them. I’d always tried to convince myself that when he was hungry, he would eat, and as long as I was giving him a quality daily multivitamin and healthy food choices, he’d be just fine. That’s still theoretically true for my son now, but for many children with more severe aversions, those labeled Resistant Eaters, this issue can present serious health concerns. It is not uncommon that children diagnosed with other disorders including Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorders would also be Resistant Eaters. Continue reading

Jan 10

Reading Readiness Is Linked to Movement

kids need to move, movement linked to pre-reading,

CC BY-SA 3.0 via Flickr Joe Shlabotnik

Today’s children sit more than ever. Babies spend hours confined in car seats and carriers rather than crawling, toddling, or being carried. As they get older their days are often heavily scheduled between educational activities and organized events. Children have 25 percent less time for free play than they did a generation ago, and that’s before factoring in distractions like TV or video games.

Left to their own devices, children move. They hold hands and whirl in a circle till they fall down laughing. They beg to take part in interesting tasks with adults. They want to face challenges and try again after making mistakes. They snuggle. They climb, dig and run. Stifling these full body needs actually impairs their ability to learn.

Continue reading